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Dealing With The Nay-Sayers... Without Getting Angry

November 27, 2017

[Image Credit: Max Pixel]

 

When you’re making changes to the norm, sometimes people around you can be less-than-supportive. This doesn’t happen to everyone, but it happens more than we would like to admit, and is easily one of the biggest obstacles we deal with when we’re trying to better ourselves.

Love them or hate them, we have family and friends that we care deeply about, and often they aren’t afraid to give their opinion.

 

One of the hardest ones to overcome is the “Warning”. It’s emotionally involving and comes across that completely sincere.

 

That's because it is.

 

Your family/friend truly believes they are giving you a valuable warning that you need to heed.

 

If you have a suspect at the moment and you haven't quite decided if they fit the bill, let's put it to a quick test.

You're sitting down with them at a cafe. You start talking about your finances and they look you straight in the eyes and say <fill in the blank>.

Is what they say a warning about your current path? That you need to either stop what you're doing, or try to tackle it a different way (because your current way is dangerous)??

Here are a few examples that might not seem so obvious at first:

 

  • "What difference will it really make in the long run?"

  • "Why suffer now? Just be normal and deal with it if it happens"

  • "Live a little!"

  • "You deserve the good things"

  • "Think of all the things you're missing out on"

 

If you've heard one or more of these from someone, I class them as a "nay-sayer". That isn't to say they don't care about you and what you're trying to achieve. In fact, usually they care very deeply. But they are not going to help you right now.

 

Today I'm going to remind you that you're definitely doing the right thing, and give you a few tricks of the trade to overcome the nay-sayers.

 

For the time being, I recommend either seeing them less or avoid the topic of money/finances altogether. When you have a tangible goal achieved, it's usually safe to tell them all about it them.

PRO TIP: If you tell them you have achieved a goal (eg. a family holiday) and they follow up by saying you can "return to normal now" (meaning to join them in their disorganisation) then go back to avoiding the topic of finances. You don't need that.

In 10 years time you want to look back and see that you have achieved something really special, right?

Don't look back on 10 years and think, "I wish I hadn't listened to ---"

 

Have a lovely week,

 

Erika Gilbert

My Income Organiser

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